Young people with palliative care needs call on Government to do more to support them

Date: 
27 June 2012
Young people with palliative care needs from all over the country will be attending a major conference in London at which they will meet with ministers and health and social care professionals to tell them how the system is failing them just when time is most precious to them.

Tomorrow (Thursday 28th June), at a major conference at the Oval Cricket Ground, hosted by Marie Curie Cancer Care with the National Council for Palliative Care, Help the Hospices and Together for Short Lives, young people will come together to celebrate their achievements and meet with the Minister of State for Care Services, Paul Burstow. Mr Burstow will give a speech and then listen to readings given by some of the young people. He will also be answering questions with the aim of highlighting some of the issues which need to be addressed in order to influence change and shape policy and practice in the future.

The National Council for Palliative Care, Help the Hospices and Together for Short Lives will be showcasing examples of good practice from six sites around the country, the result of a three-year Big Lottery funded project led by the charities with the University of York.

The event coincides with the launch of a report from Marie Curie Cancer Care which recommends that the Prime Minister personally leads a cross-government initiative to ensure that young people with palliative care needs and their families receive the care to which they are entitled.

Speaking today, Simon Chapman, Director of Policy and Parliamentary Affairs at the National Council for Palliative Care said:

“The transition from childhood can be hard enough for anyone, let alone for young people with palliative care needs who too often fall between gaps and face fragmented and ineffective provision of services. It’s essential that children’s and adult services work together to ensure that young people with palliative care needs get high quality well-co-ordinated care, where and when they need it. Young adults are adults too, which is why as a priority adult services should review how they provide care and support to them”

See the STEPP project website for more information:

http://php.york.ac.uk/inst/spru/research/summs/stepp.php

 

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